Stirring equal amounts of confusion and support from Missouri cannabis activists, Missouri’s midterm ballot will feature two constitutional Amendments and one Statute, all with the end goal of legalizing medicinal sales and use of cannabis statewide.

Only one measure needs to pass in order to legalize medicinal use cannabis, however if more than one amendment passes the amendment with the higher amount of votes wins. However the state does not have a protocol to decide the outcome of when an amendment and a statue both pass on the same issue. A 2016 tobacco-tax initiative resulted in an amendment and a statue passing which ended up being resolved in the state’s high court.

The cannabis measures on the 2018 Missouri midterm ballot are Amendment 2, Amendment 3 and Proposition C. The difference are as follows:

Amendment 2 (sponsored by New Approach Missouri) would impose a 4% tax on medicinal cannabis sales, theoretically generating $24 million in yearly state and local tax revenue and costing and estimated $7 million yearly to regulate. Generated revenue would go towards regulating the program and supporting in-state veterans. The amendment would also allow a citizen to cultivate 6 plants at home.

Amendment 2 (sponsored by Find the Cures), proposed by Springfield, MO attorney Brad Bradshaw, would impose a 15% tax on medicinal cannabis sales, theoretically generating $66 million in yearly state and local tax revenue and costing and estimated $500,000 yearly to regulate. 50% of the generated revenue would go towards a medical research facility (to which Bradshaw would become a chairman of the board), with the rest to supporting cannabis regulation and other unlisted in-state funds. The amendment does not specify the legalities of growing plants at home.

Proposition 3 (sponsored by Missourians for Patient Care) would impose a 2% tax on medicinal cannabis sales, theoretically generating $10 million in yearly state and local tax revenue and costing and estimated $10 million yearly to regulate. Generated revenues estimates include funding for a “local licensing authority, local support for first responders, public safety fire and police,” said Travis Brown a Prop C supporter. The proposition would also prohibit the cultivation of plants at home. Unlike the other two ballot measures, Proposition C is not a constitutional amendment and would only change Missouri law, and not its constitution.

Cangea’s CanPass blockchain-based taxation and payment system would theoretically allow Missouri and their proposed regulatory bodies to have instant oversight over the flow of cannabis based products and wealth distribution in the marketplace, allowing for a more transparent and observable industry as a whole. This would allow states to dramatically reduce regulatory costs- reinforcing each state’s unique ability to self-regulate and accurately represent their local industry as a whole as well as free up resources to support other state and local funds.